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Social Studies Assignments

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Medieval Europe Project

posted May 18, 2012, 10:48 AM by Karen McMillan   [ updated May 21, 2012, 10:34 AM ]

Your last social studies project of the year will be completely up to you! You get to choose your topic; you get to choose how you will share your topic with the class. 

Step One: Choose a topic from chapter nine, ten, thirteen, or fourteen that interests you. This does not necessarily have to be something specifically mentioned in the textbook. If you find something or someone from this time period that you'd like to research, feel free to submit the information for consideration.

Step Two: In a Google Doc, describe the topic you would like to research as well as the project you would like to create in order to share the information with the class. Please title your Google Doc "[student #] Medieval Europe Project". An example doc that shows how your Google Doc should look is shown below.

Step Three: Research. You will be expected to do research outside of just your textbook. Create a new Google Doc and title it "[student #] Project Notes". The information you discover will be put into this doc...in your own words. This is not a report, just your notes on your topic. Be sure to include all of the links used in your research.

Step Four: Your Project. You'll have some time in class to work on your project. You should choose a project that will appropriately showcase the topic you have chosen.

DUE DATE: Projects are due Thursday, May 31st. 


Example Google Doc

Current Events Assignment

posted May 12, 2012, 8:23 AM by Karen McMillan   [ updated May 14, 2012, 1:17 PM ]


Once your assignment is complete, I will post it here: Current Events Presentations. I would also like you to post your completed presentation to your own blog. Once everyone has finished, we will comment on each other's assignments.

Why is this topic "newsworthy"?

For one of your slides, you will need to answer the question, "Why is this topic 'newsworthy'?" In answering this question, consider the following:

  • Timeliness -- News that is happening right now, news of interest to readers right now.
  • Relevance -- The story happened nearby or is about a concern of local interest.
  • Magnitude -- The story is great in size or number; for example, a tornado that destroys a couple houses might not make the news but a story about a tornado that devastates a community would be very newsworthy.
  • Unexpectedness -- Something unusual, or something that occurs without warning.
  • Impact -- News that will affect a large number of readers.
  • Reference to someone famous or important -- News about a prominent person or personality.
  • Oddity -- A unique or unusual situation.
  • Conflict -- A major struggle in the news.
  • Reference to something negative -- Bad news often "sells" better than good news.
  • Continuity -- A follow-up or continuation to a story that has been in the news or is familiar.
  • Emotions -- Emotions (such as fear, jealousy, love, or hate) increase interest in a story.
  • Progress -- News of new hope, new achievement, new improvements.

    Be sure to explain your choices thoroughly.


    Resources





    Africa Project Reflection

    posted Feb 13, 2012, 4:15 PM by Karen McMillan

    After you have given your presentation to the class, I would like you to write a reflection piece on the project (two or more paragraphs). Think back over the project and consider these questions:
    • What did you like about the project?
    • What was challenging? What was easy?
    • Was there something that surprised you? Perhaps doing a presentation was easier or harder than you thought it would be.
    • If you were to do this project again, what would you do differently? How could you make it better?
    • What did you learn about yourself while doing this project?
    • Why do you think learning to give a presentation might be important?

    Africa Presentations Sign-up

    posted Feb 8, 2012, 6:44 PM by Karen McMillan

    Here is the order for our Africa Presentations.


    African History Powerpoint Project

    posted Dec 1, 2011, 11:37 AM by Karen McMillan   [ updated Jan 8, 2012, 10:49 AM ]


    Lesson 5.1 Questions

    posted Nov 29, 2011, 2:37 PM by Karen McMillan   [ updated Nov 29, 2011, 2:42 PM ]

    1. Create a Google Doc titled “[student #] Lesson 5.1 Questions.”
    2. Put your name, number, and date in the top right-hand corner.
    3. Copy and paste the following questions into your document:
    • What role did families play in West African society?
    • What does labor specialization mean?
    • How did trading develop in West Africa?
    • What was the relationship between kings and trade in West Africa?
    • Why were oral traditions important in West Africa?
    4. Answer the questions.
    5. Put your finished assignment into your student folder.

    Chapter Two Timelines

    posted Sep 19, 2011, 12:22 PM by Karen McMillan   [ updated Sep 22, 2011, 6:31 PM ]

    Chapter Two Timeline



    You will be creating a timeline on The Expansion and Fall of Rome for your Chapter Two assessment. The timeline will be created in Google Presentation using one slide for each of the different events. Your first slide, however, is your title slide. It should include the title of your presentation and your name.

    Each of the remaining slides in the presentation should include the following:
    • Title of the event
    • The date or dates of the event
    • Brief description of the event
    • An image (photograph, painting, map, illustration)

    Your timeline must include the following events:

    Lesson One
    • The Origins of Rome
    • Rome Becomes a Kingdom
    • The Rule of Tarquin the Proud
    • Romans Establish a Republic
    • The Rule of Julius Caesar
    • The Rule of Octavian (Augustus) - be sure to include the Pax Romana
    • The Rise of Christianity

    Lesson Two
    • Internal Weaknesses of Rome (may require more than one slide)
    • Rome Divides into East and West (be sure to include Diocletian and Constantine)
    • Fall of the Roman Empire (be sure to include Clovis)

    Lesson Three
    • The Rule of Justinian
    • The Rise of Constantinople
    • Disagreements Split Christianity
      • Include a slide that compares Roman Catholicism to Eastern Orthodox Christianity
    • The Church Splits (a separate slide that explains the “schism”)

    Lesson Four
    • Add 3 to 5 slides that describe the Legacy of Rome (art, architecture, laws, etc.)

    This project is due by Friday, September 23rd. Do not wait until the last minute! We’ll have some time in class to work on the laptops, but you will definitely need to do some of this at home.


    Birthday Geography

    posted Sep 5, 2011, 1:58 PM by Karen McMillan   [ updated Sep 7, 2011, 6:58 AM ]

    For our Birthday Geography project, please visit the following links:
    Some helpful links when using Google Maps:

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